COVID-19 Pandemic and VAWG / Fem(in)icide
This Reading list contains key reports, evaluations and other studies that are concerned with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on violence against women and girls, with a special focus on femicide. The list will be continously expanded.

 

1. Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on VAWG | UK Aid

Monday, March 16, 2020 — Studies, Analyses, Reports

Pandemics affect men and women differently. This UK Aid report shows a correlation between the COVID-19 outbreak and an increased risk of domestic violence; workplace violence in the health sector; racial and sexual harassment; abuse and exploitation for vulnerable women workers; VAWG in emergency settings; and a higher risk of sexual exploitation and violence by state officials and armed guards. 

 
 

2. Covid-19 and VAWG: Resources for Women’s Specialist Support Services, Organisations & Researchers

Monday, May 4, 2020 — Studies, Analyses, Reports

In light of the current Covid-19 pandemic, research shows that vulnerability and precarity of women and girls exacerbate during times of crises. Here you will find continuously updated information and materials to better understand the impact of Covid-19 in the field of violence against women and girls. 

Resources as of May 4th, 2020:

UN WOMEN & WHO: VAWG. DATA COLLECTION DURING COVID-19:

'This is a living document that summarizes principles and recommendations to those planning to embark on data collection on the impact of COVID-19 on violence against women and girls (VAWG). It was informed by the needs and challenges identified by colleagues in regional and country offices and has benefited from their input. It responds to the difficulties of adhering to methodological, ethical and safety principles in the context of the physical distancing and staying at home measures imposed in many countries.'

EQUALITY NOW. A JUST WORLD FOR WOMEN AND GIRLS: COVID-19 CONVERSATIONS: VIRTUAL COURT HEARINGS IN LATIN AMERICA:

'COVID-19 is exposing and exacerbating gender inequalities around the world. Each week, we’ll be sharing insights from Equality Now experts about how women’s and girls’ lives are being affected by the pandemic and what can be done to address these challenges.'

WHO: COVID-19 VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN. WHAT THE HEALTH SECTOR / SYSTEM CAN DO

UN WOMEN: THE IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON WOMEN—UN SECRETARY-GENERAL POLICY BRIEF:

'The year 2020, marking the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Beijing Platform for Action, was intended to be ground-breaking for gender equality. Instead, with the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, even the limited gains made in the past decades are at risk of being rolled back. The pandemic is deepening pre-existing inequalities, exposing vulnerabilities in social, political and economic systems which are in turn amplifying the impacts of the pandemic. Across every sphere, from health to the economy, security to social protection, the impacts of COVID-19 are exacerbated for women and girls simply by virtue of their sex. This policy brief explores how women and girls’ lives are changing in the face of COVID-19, and outlines suggested priority measures to accompany both the immediate response and longer-term recovery effort.'

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT NETWORK: 'FEMINIST RESPONSES TO COVID-19':

This constantly updated link contains resources related to 'the gendered impacts and the need for feminist approaches to be at the heart of all responses'

SPOTLIGHT INITIATIVE:

The Spotlight Initiative is a global, multi-year partnership between European Union and United Nations to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls by 2030. In their current Newsletter (#12) UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed discusses violence against women and girls during the COVID-19 pandemic and what Spotlight Initiative and its partners can do to prevent and address the spike in reports of gender-based violence'. 

GUIDELINES FOR INTEGRATING GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE INTERVENTIONS IN HUMANITARIAN ACTION

As this global epidemic escalates, feminists from across the world have been examining its gendered impacts and the need for feminist approaches to be at the heart of all responses

This repository contains a comprehensive list of resources addessing GBV risks amidst the COVID19 pandemic

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT DIRECT (SDD):

Enhancing GBV Risk Mitigation, Prevention and Response Efforts for Women and Girls with Disabilities during Covid-19 Outbreak

Why we Can and Must Continue to Provide GBV Case Management Services during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic

UK AID:

This UK Aid report shows a correlation between the COVID-19 outbreak and an increased risk of domestic violence; workplace violence in the health sector; racial and sexual harassment; abuse and exploitation for vulnerable women workers; VAWG in emergency settings; and a higher risk of sexual exploitation and violence by state officials and armed guards

WAVE

Using Technology to Communicate with Survivors During a Public Health Crisis by the National Network to End Domestic Violence (USA)

How to Operate as a Remote Workplace During a Public Health Crisis by the National Network to End Domestic Violence (USA)

Measures to minimize the risks of COVID-19 by Women Forum Elbasan

Digital Services Toolkit (online chat, text messaging, and video calls to provide services to survivors) suggestions by the National Network to End Domestic Violence (USA) 

COVID-19 Statement and Resources for VAW shelters, for women and for the general public by WOMEN’S SHELTERS CANADA

Training Curriculum on Counseling at a Distance when working with women victims of Domestic or Sexual Violence or Abuse – EU Erasmus+ project DIS.CO

CENTRE FOR FEMINIST FOREIGN POLICY:

Link with various articles, key considerations and further literature.

POLITICAL SETTLEMENTS RESEARCH PROGRAMME:

Links to information about Conflict, Development, and Covid-19 

JOHNS HOPKINS BLOOMBERG SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH:

This GoogleDocs offers a constant update on Covid-19 and gender resources

WOMEN'S INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR PEACE AND FREEDOM:

Links to relevant articles and literature, including an interview with Cynthia Enloe

WORLD BANK GROUP: GENDER DIMENSIONS OF THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC:

'The COVID-19 outbreak is impacting societies around the world in an unprecedented manner. However, not everyone, in every place, will be affected in the same way. Considering how the pandemic affects particular groups will help raise the effectiveness of containment efforts and minimize the potential negative impacts. This note focuses on one of such groups: Women and girls. Experiences from previous pandemics1 show that they can be especially active actors for change, while they can also experience the effects of the crisis in different (and often more negative) ways. Given that the COVID-19 is not gender-blind, the response to it should not be either. Based on the existing evidence and emerging trends the note summarizes key gender differentiated transmission channels and impacts on outcomes across the three areas of endowments, economic conditions, and agency. It also provides recommendations for action. This is a living document, to be completed as more data and analysis are made available.'

RESEARCH PAPERS RELEVANT TO GLOBAL EPIDEMICS AND VAWG (MANY MORE ARE INCLUDED IN THE PREVIOUS LINKS):

Labenski, Sheri. 2020. 'The Right to Reparations for Sexual and Gender-Based Violence'. Centre for Women, Peace and Security Research at LSE

Naragui Anderlini, Sanam. 2020. 'Women peace and security in the time of corona'. LSE Blogs. 

O’Brien, Melanie, and Maria Ximena Tolosa. 2016. ‘The Effect of the 2014 West Africa Ebola Virus Disease Epidemic on Multi-Level Violence against Women’. International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare 9(3):151–60.

Peterman, Amber et al. 2020. 'Pandemics and Violence against Women and Children'. Centre for Global Development. Working Paper 528. 

Ramo, Sini. 2020. 'Gendering COVID-19: implications for women, peace and security'. LSE Blogs. 

Smith, Julia. 2019. ‘Overcoming the “Tyranny of the Urgent”: Integrating Gender into Disease Outbreak Preparedness and Response’. Gender & Development 27(2):355–69.