UNODC

2019 Study on Global Homicide: Gender-related killings of women and girls | UNODC

July 8, 2019 — Official Data, Facts, Statistics
Summary:

This landmark study, first released for the 2018 International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, examines available homicide data to analyse the gender-related killing of women and girls, with a specific focus on intimate partner and family-related homicide and how this relates to the status and roles of women in society and the domestic sphere.
 

The study was re-published in Summer 2019 as booklet #5 of a series of 6 booklets constituting the 2019 Global Study on Homicide.

Author(s) / Source: UNODC


Data basis (page 7)

The data presented in this booklet are based on homicide statistics produced by national statistical systems in which the relationship between the victim and perpetrator and/or the motive are reported. While the disaggregation of homicide data at the country level has improved over the years, regional and global estimates are based on a limited number of countries, with Africa and Asia accounting for most of the gaps.
 

Key findings and figures (pages 10 and 11)

  1. Killings by intimate partners or family members 2017: A total of 87,000 women were intentionally killed in 2017. More than half of them (58 per cent)  ̶  50,000  ̶  were killed by intimate partners or family members. This means that 137 women across the world are killed by a member of their own family every day. This amounts to some six women being killed every hour by people they know.
  2. Killings by intimate partners 2017: by More than a third (30,000) of the women intentionally killed in 2017 were killed by their current or former intimate partner  ̶  someone they would normally expect to trust.
  3. Comparison with 2012: Based on revised data, the estimated number of women killed by intimate partners or family members in 2012 was 48,000 (47 per cent of all female homicide victims). The annual number of female deaths worldwide resulting from intimate partner/family-related homicide therefore seems be on the increase.
  4. Killings by region: The largest number (20,000) of all women killed worldwide by intimate partners or family members in 2017 was in Asia, followed by Africa (19,000), the Americas (8,000) Europe (3,000) and Oceania (300). However, with an intimate partner/family-related homicide rate of 3.1 per 100,000 female population, Africa is the region where women run the greatest risk of being killed by their intimate partner or family members, while Europe (0.7 per 100,000 population) is the region where the risk is lowest. The intimate partner/family-related homicide rate was also high in the Americas in 2017, at 1.6 per 100,000 female population, as well as Oceania, at 1.3, and Asia, at 0.9.
  5. Shares of female vs. male victimes: The disparity between the shares of male and female victims of homicide perpetrated exclusively by an intimate partner is substantially larger than of victims of homicide perpetrated by intimate partners or family members: roughly 82 per cent female victims versus 18 percent male victims.
#APRAN Official Data, Facts, Statistics

2019 Study on Global Homicide: Gender-related killings of women and girls | UNODC

July 8, 2019
#UNODC, #femicide, #study, #global data, #statistics, #data, #homicide, #definition

Executive Summary

This landmark study, first released for the 2018 International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, examines available homicide data to analyse the gender-related killing of women and girls, with a specific focus on intimate partner and family-related homicide and how this relates to the status and roles of women in society and the domestic sphere.
 

The study was re-published in Summer 2019 as booklet #5 of a series of 6 booklets constituting the 2019 Global Study on Homicide.

Andrada Filip, Angela Me — UNODC


Data basis (page 7)

The data presented in this booklet are based on homicide statistics produced by national statistical systems in which the relationship between the victim and perpetrator and/or the motive are reported. While the disaggregation of homicide data at the country level has improved over the years, regional and global estimates are based on a limited number of countries, with Africa and Asia accounting for most of the gaps.
 

Key findings and figures (pages 10 and 11)

  1. Killings by intimate partners or family members 2017: A total of 87,000 women were intentionally killed in 2017. More than half of them (58 per cent)  ̶  50,000  ̶  were killed by intimate partners or family members. This means that 137 women across the world are killed by a member of their own family every day. This amounts to some six women being killed every hour by people they know.
  2. Killings by intimate partners 2017: by More than a third (30,000) of the women intentionally killed in 2017 were killed by their current or former intimate partner  ̶  someone they would normally expect to trust.
  3. Comparison with 2012: Based on revised data, the estimated number of women killed by intimate partners or family members in 2012 was 48,000 (47 per cent of all female homicide victims). The annual number of female deaths worldwide resulting from intimate partner/family-related homicide therefore seems be on the increase.
  4. Killings by region: The largest number (20,000) of all women killed worldwide by intimate partners or family members in 2017 was in Asia, followed by Africa (19,000), the Americas (8,000) Europe (3,000) and Oceania (300). However, with an intimate partner/family-related homicide rate of 3.1 per 100,000 female population, Africa is the region where women run the greatest risk of being killed by their intimate partner or family members, while Europe (0.7 per 100,000 population) is the region where the risk is lowest. The intimate partner/family-related homicide rate was also high in the Americas in 2017, at 1.6 per 100,000 female population, as well as Oceania, at 1.3, and Asia, at 0.9.
  5. Shares of female vs. male victimes: The disparity between the shares of male and female victims of homicide perpetrated exclusively by an intimate partner is substantially larger than of victims of homicide perpetrated by intimate partners or family members: roughly 82 per cent female victims versus 18 percent male victims.

Global → femicide

UNGA Resolution 68/191 (2014) on Taking Action against Gender-related Killing of Women and Girls

February 11, 2014 — Policies, Guidelines, Jurisprudence
Summary:

In this landmark resolution member states were invited to provide UNODC with information related to best practices and other relevant information related to the investigation and prosecution of gender-related killing of women and girls.

Author(s) / Source: UNODC
#APRAN Policies, Guidelines, Jurisprudence

UNGA Resolution 68/191 (2014) on Taking Action against Gender-related Killing of Women and Girls

February 11, 2014
#femicide, #resolution, #General Assembly, #UNGA, #best practices, #investigation, #prosecution

Executive Summary

In this landmark resolution member states were invited to provide UNODC with information related to best practices and other relevant information related to the investigation and prosecution of gender-related killing of women and girls.

UNODC

Global → gender equality

Empowering Women and Girls When Tackling Drugs and Crime | UNODC

March 1, 2018 — Studies, Analyses, Reports
Summary:

The present Strategy for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (2018-2021) establishes the first institutional framework on gender equality for the United Nations Office at Vienna (UNOV) and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

Author(s) / Source: UNODC
#APRAN Studies, Analyses, Reports

Empowering Women and Girls When Tackling Drugs and Crime | UNODC

March 1, 2018
#gender equality, #empowerment, #women, #girls, #UNODC

Executive Summary

The present Strategy for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (2018-2021) establishes the first institutional framework on gender equality for the United Nations Office at Vienna (UNOV) and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

UNODC

Global → femicide

2015 International Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (ICCS) | UNODC

January 1, 2015 — Official Data, Facts, Statistics
Summary:

 

The International Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (ICCS), in its first version, provides a comprehensive framework for producing statistics on crime and criminal justice, including homicide and - as part of it - femicide.

Author(s) / Source: UNODC

 

The International Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (ICCS) was developed using the “Principles and framework for an international classification of crimes for statistical purposes” produced by the UNECE-UNODC Joint Task Force on Crime Classification and endorsed by the Conference of European Statisticians in 2012.

The ICCS was produced on the basis of the plan to finalize by 2015 an international classification of crime for statistical purposes, as approved by the Statistical Commission in its decision 44/110 and by the Economic and Social Council in its resolution 2013/37.

 

#APRAN Official Data, Facts, Statistics

2015 International Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (ICCS) | UNODC

January 1, 2015
#UNODC, #classification, #criminal statistics, #statistics, #ICCS, #standard, #data collection

Executive Summary

 

The International Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (ICCS), in its first version, provides a comprehensive framework for producing statistics on crime and criminal justice, including homicide and - as part of it - femicide.

UNODC

 

The International Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (ICCS) was developed using the “Principles and framework for an international classification of crimes for statistical purposes” produced by the UNECE-UNODC Joint Task Force on Crime Classification and endorsed by the Conference of European Statisticians in 2012.

The ICCS was produced on the basis of the plan to finalize by 2015 an international classification of crime for statistical purposes, as approved by the Statistical Commission in its decision 44/110 and by the Economic and Social Council in its resolution 2013/37.

 

2013 Global Study on Homicide | UNODC

January 1, 2018 — Official Data, Facts, Statistics
Summary:

The Global Study on Homicide 2013 seeks to shed light on the worst of crimes - the "unlawful death purposefully inflicted on a person by another person."

Author(s) / Source: UNODC

In 2012, intentional homicide took the lives of almost half a million people. The study of intentional homicide is relevant not only because it is the study of the ultimate crime, whose ripple effect goes far beyond the initial loss of human life, but because lethal violence can create a climate of fear and uncertainty. Intentional homicide also victimizes the family and community of the victim, who can be considered secondary victims, and when justice is not served, impunity can lead to further victimization in the form of the denial of the basic human right to justice.

#APRAN Official Data, Facts, Statistics

2013 Global Study on Homicide | UNODC

January 1, 2018
#data, #statistics, #homicide, #femicide, #global study, #UNODC, #Report

Executive Summary

The Global Study on Homicide 2013 seeks to shed light on the worst of crimes - the "unlawful death purposefully inflicted on a person by another person."

UNODC

In 2012, intentional homicide took the lives of almost half a million people. The study of intentional homicide is relevant not only because it is the study of the ultimate crime, whose ripple effect goes far beyond the initial loss of human life, but because lethal violence can create a climate of fear and uncertainty. Intentional homicide also victimizes the family and community of the victim, who can be considered secondary victims, and when justice is not served, impunity can lead to further victimization in the form of the denial of the basic human right to justice.