data

Call It Femicide: Femicide in Canada 2018 | Canadian Femicide Observatory

January 1, 2019 — Research, Studies, Analyses, Reports

Must-read report by the new Canadian Femicide Observatory CFOJA. It includes data and statistics on femicide in Canada in 2018 (148 women and girls were killed by violence), based on media reports, while also covering past and ongoing work on femicide in Canada as well as current and emerging trends on the international level. The CFOJA coined the new hashtag #CallItFemicide.

Myrna Dawson, Danielle Sutton, Michelle Carrigan, Valérie Grand'Maison — Myrna Dawson Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice and Accountability

 

Foreword, page 5:

"The recent call by the United Nations for countries to create femicide observatories is a significant and urgent signal. Despite research done to date, and advances made, this issue remains a very serious and critical issue for women and girls in Canada and around the world.

The CFOJA was established to respond to this call. Its work is supported and strengthened by collaborations among researchers and an advisory panel of experts from across the country. This ensures that the work is both grounded in accurate statistical data and accompanied by a reliable and accessible presentation of information in a way that best reflects the realities of the women and girls who are killed by violence in Canada. This was also the methodology undertaken several decades ago by the Women We Honour Action Committee when it conducted the original intimate femicide research in Ontario.

This report is a testament to that earlier research and activism because those findings remain accurate and unchallenged. They have also created a solid foundation for ongoing research today.

Since this original study, much more research has been done on femicide, but little appears to have changed when it comes to how it occurs and why. Progress on prevention and on accountability has been slow to evolve. We have yet to meet the basic standard required to prevent these killings or to hold perpetrators accountable in a manner that would reflect widespread condemnation of these crimes.

This report contains critical information that builds on the earlier and ongoing work on femicide in Canada and internationally by highlighting current and emerging trends and issues that require further investigation and monitoring in the coming years. We continue this work because we believe that femicide is preventable."

Executive Summary, pages 7 and 8:

"The Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice and Accountability (CFOJA) is the sole Canadian initiative responding to the United Nations call to establish femicide observatories1 to more comprehensively and accurately document gender-related killings of women and girls or ‘femicide’. The CFOJA mandate is to establish a visible and national focus on femicide in Canada by: (1) documenting femicides as they occur in Canada; and, (2) monitoring state, legal and social responses to these killings.

This is the CFOJA’s inaugural one-year report focusing on women and girls killed by violence in Canada from January 1 to December 31, 2018.

Section I discusses the evolution of the term ‘femicide’ internationally and in the Canadian context. For the latter, three key turning points are highlighted: (1) the mass femicide at École Polytechnique, Université of Montréal in 1989; (2) early research on intimate femicide in Ontario by the Women We Honour Action Committee; and (3) grassroots initiatives that drew national and international attention to missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. The section concludes with a description of the definitional parameters for femicide adopted by the CFOJA.

Section II focuses on all women and girls killed by violence in Canada in 2018 which were identified through media reports. Some highlights are as follows:

  • In 2018, 148 women and girls were killed by violence in Canada. On average, every 2.5 days one woman or girl is killed in this country – a consistent trend for four decades.
  • The highest rate of killing of women and girls wasin Nunavut followed by the Yukon, New Brunswick and Manitoba. The lowest rate was in Quebec followed by British Columbia and Nova Scotia.
  • Indigenous women and girls were overrepresented as victims, comprising about five percent of the population in Canada, but 36 percent of those women and girls who were killed by violence.
  • Approximately 34 percent of women and girls were killed in rural areas whereas only about 16 percent of the population in Canada lives in rural areas.
  • Women and girls aged 25-34 years were overrepresented as victims: 27 percent of those killed, but only 14 percent of the population.
  • The most common method used when a woman or girl was killed was shooting (34%) followed by stabbing (28%) and beating (24%)
  • Approximately 11 percent of the accused committed suicide following the killing – all of whom were male.
  • Where an accused has been identified, 91% are male accused, consistent with national and international patterns.

Section III focuses on cases involving the killing of women and girls by male accused. Three types of femicide are focused upon in particular: (1) intimate femicide; (2) familial femicide; and (3) non-intimate femicide (i.e. perpetrated by male acquaintances and strangers). This section also introduces five gender-based motives/indicators for femicide: (1) misogyny; (2) sexual violence; (3) coercive-controlling behaviours, including jealousy and stalking; (4) separation/estrangement; and (5) overkill.

Some highlights related to the most common type of femicide – intimate femicide – are as follows:

  • Like global patterns, the home is the most dangerous place for women and girls with 53% killed by male partners and another 13 percent killed by other male family members. The remainder were killed by male strangers (21%) or acquaintances (13%).
  • Intimate femicide victims in both Ontario (45%) and Alberta (16%) are overrepresented slightly relative to the proportion of Canadian women living in those jurisdictions (39% and 11% respectively). Intimate femicide victims in Quebec (10%) were underrepresented compared to the proportion of women living in that province (23%).
  • A higher proportion of intimate femicide involved visible minority women compared to their representation in the population in contrast to the total sample of women and girls killed where they were underrepresented as victims when information on race/ethnicity was known.
  • Examining relationship status, the largest proportion of victim and accused were common-law partners (38%), followed closely by those who were legally married (36%) and then dating (27%). One in five of the intimate femicide victims were separated from the accused (22%).
  • Like the total sample, shooting was the most common method in intimate femicides (35%).
  • A higher proportion of accused committed suicide following the intimate femicide (27% compared to 11% of the total sample of women and girls killed by violence).

Section IV discusses some current and emerging research priorities for informed prevention. We focus first on situational factors that have emerged as more common in the 2018 cases: (1) intimacy; (2) rurality; (3) firearms; and (4) collateral victims. We then turn to various socio-demographic factors that were common in the 2018 cases or appeared in cases that highlighted groups of victims that may be more at risk of femicide, but for whom there has been little research attention. These include: (1) Indigenous women and girls; (2) immigrant women and girls; (3) older women; and (4) women and girls with disabilities.

Section V discusses future research planned by the CFOJA that will focus on the broader community- or societal-level factors that research has shown can work to facilitate, or prevent, male violence against women, including problematic attitudes, beliefs and stereotypes that impede prevention efforts. The three arenas examined will be: (1) the media; (2) the criminal justice system, particularly the courts; and, finally, (3) the legislative and policy contexts. All three arenas can play a powerful role in challenging, or entrenching, problematic attitudes, beliefs and stereotypes that work to perpetuate and maintain men’s violence against women and girls.

Section VI remembers all women and girls killed by violence in Canada in 2018. We include quotes throughout the report from family members and friends impacted by their deaths as one way of showing their lost potential and ongoing impacts on those they leave behind due to femicide.

The CFOJA research is ongoing. Early in 2019, we will complete data collection for women and girls killed by violence in Canada in 2016 and 2017. We will continue to document femicides of women and girls in our country for earlier years. We also continue to collect information on male homicides for comparative purposes. Therefore, future reports will aim: (1) to describe trends and patterns in femicide over time; (2) to compare the characteristics and circumstances surrounding femicide to that of homicide involving male victims; and (3) to identify and monitor current and emerging themes in femicide, including priorities for research and prevention."

 

 

#APRAN Research, Studies, Analyses, Reports

Call It Femicide: Femicide in Canada 2018 | Canadian Femicide Observatory

January 1, 2019
#femicide, #statistics, #data, #data collection, #media reports, #observatory, #femicide watch, #definition, #homicide, #grassroots
Canada

Executive Summary

Must-read report by the new Canadian Femicide Observatory CFOJA. It includes data and statistics on femicide in Canada in 2018 (148 women and girls were killed by violence), based on media reports, while also covering past and ongoing work on femicide in Canada as well as current and emerging trends on the international level. The CFOJA coined the new hashtag #CallItFemicide.

Myrna Dawson, Danielle Sutton, Michelle Carrigan, Valérie Grand'Maison — Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice and Accountability

 

Foreword, page 5:

"The recent call by the United Nations for countries to create femicide observatories is a significant and urgent signal. Despite research done to date, and advances made, this issue remains a very serious and critical issue for women and girls in Canada and around the world.

The CFOJA was established to respond to this call. Its work is supported and strengthened by collaborations among researchers and an advisory panel of experts from across the country. This ensures that the work is both grounded in accurate statistical data and accompanied by a reliable and accessible presentation of information in a way that best reflects the realities of the women and girls who are killed by violence in Canada. This was also the methodology undertaken several decades ago by the Women We Honour Action Committee when it conducted the original intimate femicide research in Ontario.

This report is a testament to that earlier research and activism because those findings remain accurate and unchallenged. They have also created a solid foundation for ongoing research today.

Since this original study, much more research has been done on femicide, but little appears to have changed when it comes to how it occurs and why. Progress on prevention and on accountability has been slow to evolve. We have yet to meet the basic standard required to prevent these killings or to hold perpetrators accountable in a manner that would reflect widespread condemnation of these crimes.

This report contains critical information that builds on the earlier and ongoing work on femicide in Canada and internationally by highlighting current and emerging trends and issues that require further investigation and monitoring in the coming years. We continue this work because we believe that femicide is preventable."

Executive Summary, pages 7 and 8:

"The Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice and Accountability (CFOJA) is the sole Canadian initiative responding to the United Nations call to establish femicide observatories1 to more comprehensively and accurately document gender-related killings of women and girls or ‘femicide’. The CFOJA mandate is to establish a visible and national focus on femicide in Canada by: (1) documenting femicides as they occur in Canada; and, (2) monitoring state, legal and social responses to these killings.

This is the CFOJA’s inaugural one-year report focusing on women and girls killed by violence in Canada from January 1 to December 31, 2018.

Section I discusses the evolution of the term ‘femicide’ internationally and in the Canadian context. For the latter, three key turning points are highlighted: (1) the mass femicide at École Polytechnique, Université of Montréal in 1989; (2) early research on intimate femicide in Ontario by the Women We Honour Action Committee; and (3) grassroots initiatives that drew national and international attention to missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. The section concludes with a description of the definitional parameters for femicide adopted by the CFOJA.

Section II focuses on all women and girls killed by violence in Canada in 2018 which were identified through media reports. Some highlights are as follows:

  • In 2018, 148 women and girls were killed by violence in Canada. On average, every 2.5 days one woman or girl is killed in this country – a consistent trend for four decades.
  • The highest rate of killing of women and girls wasin Nunavut followed by the Yukon, New Brunswick and Manitoba. The lowest rate was in Quebec followed by British Columbia and Nova Scotia.
  • Indigenous women and girls were overrepresented as victims, comprising about five percent of the population in Canada, but 36 percent of those women and girls who were killed by violence.
  • Approximately 34 percent of women and girls were killed in rural areas whereas only about 16 percent of the population in Canada lives in rural areas.
  • Women and girls aged 25-34 years were overrepresented as victims: 27 percent of those killed, but only 14 percent of the population.
  • The most common method used when a woman or girl was killed was shooting (34%) followed by stabbing (28%) and beating (24%)
  • Approximately 11 percent of the accused committed suicide following the killing – all of whom were male.
  • Where an accused has been identified, 91% are male accused, consistent with national and international patterns.

Section III focuses on cases involving the killing of women and girls by male accused. Three types of femicide are focused upon in particular: (1) intimate femicide; (2) familial femicide; and (3) non-intimate femicide (i.e. perpetrated by male acquaintances and strangers). This section also introduces five gender-based motives/indicators for femicide: (1) misogyny; (2) sexual violence; (3) coercive-controlling behaviours, including jealousy and stalking; (4) separation/estrangement; and (5) overkill.

Some highlights related to the most common type of femicide – intimate femicide – are as follows:

  • Like global patterns, the home is the most dangerous place for women and girls with 53% killed by male partners and another 13 percent killed by other male family members. The remainder were killed by male strangers (21%) or acquaintances (13%).
  • Intimate femicide victims in both Ontario (45%) and Alberta (16%) are overrepresented slightly relative to the proportion of Canadian women living in those jurisdictions (39% and 11% respectively). Intimate femicide victims in Quebec (10%) were underrepresented compared to the proportion of women living in that province (23%).
  • A higher proportion of intimate femicide involved visible minority women compared to their representation in the population in contrast to the total sample of women and girls killed where they were underrepresented as victims when information on race/ethnicity was known.
  • Examining relationship status, the largest proportion of victim and accused were common-law partners (38%), followed closely by those who were legally married (36%) and then dating (27%). One in five of the intimate femicide victims were separated from the accused (22%).
  • Like the total sample, shooting was the most common method in intimate femicides (35%).
  • A higher proportion of accused committed suicide following the intimate femicide (27% compared to 11% of the total sample of women and girls killed by violence).

Section IV discusses some current and emerging research priorities for informed prevention. We focus first on situational factors that have emerged as more common in the 2018 cases: (1) intimacy; (2) rurality; (3) firearms; and (4) collateral victims. We then turn to various socio-demographic factors that were common in the 2018 cases or appeared in cases that highlighted groups of victims that may be more at risk of femicide, but for whom there has been little research attention. These include: (1) Indigenous women and girls; (2) immigrant women and girls; (3) older women; and (4) women and girls with disabilities.

Section V discusses future research planned by the CFOJA that will focus on the broader community- or societal-level factors that research has shown can work to facilitate, or prevent, male violence against women, including problematic attitudes, beliefs and stereotypes that impede prevention efforts. The three arenas examined will be: (1) the media; (2) the criminal justice system, particularly the courts; and, finally, (3) the legislative and policy contexts. All three arenas can play a powerful role in challenging, or entrenching, problematic attitudes, beliefs and stereotypes that work to perpetuate and maintain men’s violence against women and girls.

Section VI remembers all women and girls killed by violence in Canada in 2018. We include quotes throughout the report from family members and friends impacted by their deaths as one way of showing their lost potential and ongoing impacts on those they leave behind due to femicide.

The CFOJA research is ongoing. Early in 2019, we will complete data collection for women and girls killed by violence in Canada in 2016 and 2017. We will continue to document femicides of women and girls in our country for earlier years. We also continue to collect information on male homicides for comparative purposes. Therefore, future reports will aim: (1) to describe trends and patterns in femicide over time; (2) to compare the characteristics and circumstances surrounding femicide to that of homicide involving male victims; and (3) to identify and monitor current and emerging themes in femicide, including priorities for research and prevention."

 

 

Canada

 
Canada

March 21, 2019 - Dossier
Canada leads by example: The recently founded Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice and Accountability is a stellar manifestation of a national "Femicide Watch" that the UN Special Rapporteur on VAW has been calling for. The Observatory is based on and continues its research work on femicide, conducted by members of the Centre for the Study of Social and Legal Responses to Violence at the University of Guelph. Various studies and reports have been published with data and statistics on femicide case, e.g. in the Ontario region, a few of which will be presented on this platform.
# femicide #research #data #data collection #media reports #observatory #statistics

What data do we have on femicide? Editorial Team

November 29, 2018 — Official Data, Facts, Statistics

The key question that we all seek to answer is: How many women and girls are getting killed because of their gender -- also: why, by whom, and where? There are limitations to the efforts to collect comparable, reliable, gender-disaggregated data for each country or region in the world. We would like to use this platform to sensitize our readers for these limitations, but also inform them about existing data and the possibilities to improve the international community's, national statistical bodies' and NGO data collection efforts.

FWP Editorial TEam


The challenge of collecting data on femicide

In the context of data collection on femicide, it is important to distinguish between data collected at the national and at the international level. Some forms of femicide are more prevalent in some countries than in others, as this depends on the socio-cultural background. Furthermore, depending on the institutional and administrative capacities of a given country or region, there are states which only collect data on homicide, and others, particularly in Latin America, which do collect data on femicide, according to the way in which this type of criminal offense has been classified in the country’s legal framework.

Hence, when it comes to having statistics on this phenomenon at the global level it is important to stick to a framework that enables us to have the most comprehensive coverage of countries that are adequately covered. Moreover, it is important to operate within a statistical framework accepted by states, acknowledging the great diversity of legal systems that exist.

UNODC methodology as key reference

When it comes to presenting statistics on femicide at the global level, this platform will operate within the broader framework of homicide, presenting data on the subset categories of homicide by intimate partners and family members. This approach is in line with the methodology adopted by UNODC in its 2018 and 2013 Global Studies on Homicide and also in its International Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (2015). This by no means denies the existence of other forms of femicide: information on other direct and indirect categories of femicide will also be collected.

The work of observatories and NGOs

Census UK

Canada

European Observatory

Latin America Observatory

#APRAN Official Data, Facts, Statistics

What data do we have on femicide? Editorial Team

November 29, 2018
#data, #data collection, #statistics, #UNODC, #global studies, #national statistics, #challenges

Executive Summary

The key question that we all seek to answer is: How many women and girls are getting killed because of their gender -- also: why, by whom, and where? There are limitations to the efforts to collect comparable, reliable, gender-disaggregated data for each country or region in the world. We would like to use this platform to sensitize our readers for these limitations, but also inform them about existing data and the possibilities to improve the international community's, national statistical bodies' and NGO data collection efforts.

FWP Editorial TEam


The challenge of collecting data on femicide

In the context of data collection on femicide, it is important to distinguish between data collected at the national and at the international level. Some forms of femicide are more prevalent in some countries than in others, as this depends on the socio-cultural background. Furthermore, depending on the institutional and administrative capacities of a given country or region, there are states which only collect data on homicide, and others, particularly in Latin America, which do collect data on femicide, according to the way in which this type of criminal offense has been classified in the country’s legal framework.

Hence, when it comes to having statistics on this phenomenon at the global level it is important to stick to a framework that enables us to have the most comprehensive coverage of countries that are adequately covered. Moreover, it is important to operate within a statistical framework accepted by states, acknowledging the great diversity of legal systems that exist.

UNODC methodology as key reference

When it comes to presenting statistics on femicide at the global level, this platform will operate within the broader framework of homicide, presenting data on the subset categories of homicide by intimate partners and family members. This approach is in line with the methodology adopted by UNODC in its 2018 and 2013 Global Studies on Homicide and also in its International Classification of Crime for Statistical Purposes (2015). This by no means denies the existence of other forms of femicide: information on other direct and indirect categories of femicide will also be collected.

The work of observatories and NGOs

Census UK

Canada

European Observatory

Latin America Observatory

2018 Study on Global Homicide: Gender-related killings of women and girls | UNODC

November 25, 2018 — Official Data, Facts, Statistics

This landmark study, released for the 2018 International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, examines available homicide data to analyse the gender-related killing of women and girls, with a specific focus on intimate partner and family-related homicide and how this relates to the status and roles of women in society and the domestic sphere.

Andrada Filip, Angela Me — UNODC


Key comparison: overall homicides, killings by family members, by intimate partners

UNODC Global Homicide Study 2018 Graph1
UNODC Global Homicide Study 2018

Key findings and figures (pages 10 and 11)

  1. Killings by intimate partners or family members 2017: A total of 87,000 women were intentionally killed in 2017. More than half of them (58 per cent)  ̶  50,000  ̶  were killed by intimate partners or family members. This means that 137 women across the world are killed by a member of their own family every day. This amounts to some six women being killed every hour by people they know.
  2. Killings by intimate partners 2017: by More than a third (30,000) of the women intentionally killed in 2017 were killed by their current or former intimate partner  ̶  someone they would normally expect to trust.
  3. Comparison with 2012: Based on revised data, the estimated number of women killed by intimate partners or family members in 2012 was 48,000 (47 per cent of all female homicide victims). The annual number of female deaths worldwide resulting from intimate partner/family-related homicide therefore seems be on the increase.
  4. Killings by region: The largest number (20,000) of all women killed worldwide by intimate partners or family members in 2017 was in Asia, followed by Africa (19,000), the Americas (8,000) Europe (3,000) and Oceania (300). However, with an intimate partner/family-related homicide rate of 3.1 per 100,000 female population, Africa is the region where women run the greatest risk of being killed by their intimate partner or family members, while Europe (0.7 per 100,000 population) is the region where the risk is lowest. The intimate partner/family-related homicide rate was also high in the Americas in 2017, at 1.6 per 100,000 female population, as well as Oceania, at 1.3, and Asia, at 0.9.
  5. Shares of female vs. male victimes: The disparity between the shares of male and female victims of homicide perpetrated exclusively by an intimate partner is substantially larger than of victims of homicide perpetrated by intimate partners or family members: roughly 82 per cent female victims versus 18 percent male victims.
#APRAN Official Data, Facts, Statistics

2018 Study on Global Homicide: Gender-related killings of women and girls | UNODC

November 25, 2018
#UNODC, #femicide, #study, #global data, #statistics, #data, #homicide, #definition

Executive Summary

This landmark study, released for the 2018 International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, examines available homicide data to analyse the gender-related killing of women and girls, with a specific focus on intimate partner and family-related homicide and how this relates to the status and roles of women in society and the domestic sphere.

Andrada Filip, Angela Me — UNODC


Key comparison: overall homicides, killings by family members, by intimate partners

UNODC Global Homicide Study 2018 Graph1
UNODC Global Homicide Study 2018

Key findings and figures (pages 10 and 11)

  1. Killings by intimate partners or family members 2017: A total of 87,000 women were intentionally killed in 2017. More than half of them (58 per cent)  ̶  50,000  ̶  were killed by intimate partners or family members. This means that 137 women across the world are killed by a member of their own family every day. This amounts to some six women being killed every hour by people they know.
  2. Killings by intimate partners 2017: by More than a third (30,000) of the women intentionally killed in 2017 were killed by their current or former intimate partner  ̶  someone they would normally expect to trust.
  3. Comparison with 2012: Based on revised data, the estimated number of women killed by intimate partners or family members in 2012 was 48,000 (47 per cent of all female homicide victims). The annual number of female deaths worldwide resulting from intimate partner/family-related homicide therefore seems be on the increase.
  4. Killings by region: The largest number (20,000) of all women killed worldwide by intimate partners or family members in 2017 was in Asia, followed by Africa (19,000), the Americas (8,000) Europe (3,000) and Oceania (300). However, with an intimate partner/family-related homicide rate of 3.1 per 100,000 female population, Africa is the region where women run the greatest risk of being killed by their intimate partner or family members, while Europe (0.7 per 100,000 population) is the region where the risk is lowest. The intimate partner/family-related homicide rate was also high in the Americas in 2017, at 1.6 per 100,000 female population, as well as Oceania, at 1.3, and Asia, at 0.9.
  5. Shares of female vs. male victimes: The disparity between the shares of male and female victims of homicide perpetrated exclusively by an intimate partner is substantially larger than of victims of homicide perpetrated by intimate partners or family members: roughly 82 per cent female victims versus 18 percent male victims.

Explore the Facts: Violence Against Women | UN Women

January 1, 2018 — Official Data, Facts, Statistics

This fantastic interactive platform exposes the various forms of abuse that women endure.

UN Women

"Intimate partner violence is any behaviour by a current or former partner or spouse that causes physical, sexual or psychological harm. This is the most common form of violence experienced by women globally.

Worldwide, 1 in 3 women have experienced physical or sexual violence — mostly by an intimate partner..."

#APRAN Official Data, Facts, Statistics

Explore the Facts: Violence Against Women | UN Women

January 1, 2018
#statistics, #facts, #intimate partner violence, #violence against women, #VAW, #UN Women, #platform, #data

Executive Summary

This fantastic interactive platform exposes the various forms of abuse that women endure.

UN Women

"Intimate partner violence is any behaviour by a current or former partner or spouse that causes physical, sexual or psychological harm. This is the most common form of violence experienced by women globally.

Worldwide, 1 in 3 women have experienced physical or sexual violence — mostly by an intimate partner..."

A Deadly Politics of Wealth: Femicide in India | openDemocracy

August 2, 2016 — Research, Studies, Analyses, Reports

Census data shows that poverty and illiteracy are not key factors in India’s female genocide as many assume. The survival of girls is determined by a patriarchal politics of wealth control.

openDemocracy
#APRAN Research, Studies, Analyses, Reports

A Deadly Politics of Wealth: Femicide in India | openDemocracy

August 2, 2016
#femicide, #India, #census data, #data, #statistics, #patriarchal politics
India

Executive Summary

Census data shows that poverty and illiteracy are not key factors in India’s female genocide as many assume. The survival of girls is determined by a patriarchal politics of wealth control.

openDemocracy

Femicide in Mexico Has More Than Doubled Since 2007 | Global Citizen

December 14, 2017 — Research, Studies, Analyses, Reports

A recent report from Mexico’s interior department, the National Women’s Institute, and UN Women reveals that violence against women is nearly as high as it was at its peak in 2012 and more than twice as high as it was in 2007.

Global Citizen
#APRAN Research, Studies, Analyses, Reports

Femicide in Mexico Has More Than Doubled Since 2007 | Global Citizen

December 14, 2017
#femicide, #Mexico, #data, #statistics, #government, #UN Women, #VAW, #violence against women
Mexico

Executive Summary

A recent report from Mexico’s interior department, the National Women’s Institute, and UN Women reveals that violence against women is nearly as high as it was at its peak in 2012 and more than twice as high as it was in 2007.

Global Citizen

Femicide in Italy | Casa delle donne

November 1, 2016 — Research, Studies, Analyses, Reports

The report (in Italian language) offers an insight into the prevalence of femicide in Italy. Detailed statistics are presented on the number of women killed in Italy between 2005 and 2016. According to the data explored in the report, a total of 1395 women have been killed.

Casa delle donne
#APRAN Research, Studies, Analyses, Reports

Femicide in Italy | Casa delle donne

November 1, 2016
#Italy, #femicide, #data, #statistics, #2016
Italy

Executive Summary

The report (in Italian language) offers an insight into the prevalence of femicide in Italy. Detailed statistics are presented on the number of women killed in Italy between 2005 and 2016. According to the data explored in the report, a total of 1395 women have been killed.

Casa delle donne

Global → femicide

Lethal forms of femicide | Small Arms Survey

February 1, 2012 — Research, Studies, Analyses, Reports

This Research Note examines lethal forms of violence against women. It defines femicide and relies on the disaggregated data on femicides produced for the Global Burden of Armed Violence in 2011.

Small Arms Survey

"About 66,000 women and girls are violently killed every year, accounting for approximately 17 per cent of all victims of intentional homicides. While the data on which these conservative estimates are based is incomplete, it does reveal certain patterns with respect to the male v. female victim ratio in homicides, intimate partner violence, and the use of firearms in femicides—defined here as ‘the killing of a woman’. ..."
 

#APRAN Research, Studies, Analyses, Reports

Lethal forms of femicide | Small Arms Survey

February 1, 2012
#femicide, #data, #definition, #research, #violence, #homicides, #firearms

Executive Summary

This Research Note examines lethal forms of violence against women. It defines femicide and relies on the disaggregated data on femicides produced for the Global Burden of Armed Violence in 2011.

Small Arms Survey

"About 66,000 women and girls are violently killed every year, accounting for approximately 17 per cent of all victims of intentional homicides. While the data on which these conservative estimates are based is incomplete, it does reveal certain patterns with respect to the male v. female victim ratio in homicides, intimate partner violence, and the use of firearms in femicides—defined here as ‘the killing of a woman’. ..."
 

Spain → elderly women

Femicide Rates Elderly Women 2010-2015 in Spain |

November 20, 2017 — Research, Studies, Analyses, Reports

One in four women murdered in Spain between 2010 and 2015 was over 60 years old (25.7%). The most common victimizers are the current partners of the victims (31%) and/or their children (19%).

feminicidio.net
#APRAN Research, Studies, Analyses, Reports

Femicide Rates Elderly Women 2010-2015 in Spain |

November 20, 2017
#data, #femicide, #elderly women, #older women, #violence against women, #Spain, #statistics, #infographic
Spain

Executive Summary

One in four women murdered in Spain between 2010 and 2015 was over 60 years old (25.7%). The most common victimizers are the current partners of the victims (31%) and/or their children (19%).

feminicidio.net

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