Istanbul Convention

Terminology and Indicators for Data Collection: Rape, Femicide and Intimate Partner Violence Report | EIGE

December 13, 2017 — Research, Analysis, Report, Study

This report lays the ground for the establishment of a measure of violence against women through the use of harmonised definitions and indicators on rape, femicide and intimate partner violence. A set of definitions and indicators are put forward.

EIGE
#APRAN Research, Analysis, Report, Study

Terminology and Indicators for Data Collection: Rape, Femicide and Intimate Partner Violence Report | EIGE

December 13, 2017
#femicide, #data collection, #terminology, #indicators, #intimate-partner violence, #Istanbul Convention, #EIGE

Executive Summary

This report lays the ground for the establishment of a measure of violence against women through the use of harmonised definitions and indicators on rape, femicide and intimate partner violence. A set of definitions and indicators are put forward.

EIGE

Latin America and the Caribbean → femicide

Feminicide: A Global Phenomenon 5th ed. | Heinrich Böll Stiftung

August 1, 2017 — Research, Analysis, Report, Study

This publication presents articles written by prominent feminists, women´s human rights activists, academics and representatives from civil society in Latin American (LA) and the European Union (EU) regarding the mass demonstrations of feminicide. The fifth edition of “Feminicide: A Global Phenomenon” covers topics such as feminicide in different countries, the recent call of the UN-Rapporteur and the absolute criminalization of abortion.

Patricia Jiménez, Ana Martínez Fernández — Heinrich Böll Stiftung
#APRAN Research, Analysis, Report, Study

Feminicide: A Global Phenomenon 5th ed. | Heinrich Böll Stiftung

August 1, 2017
#femicide, #abortion, #Istanbul Convention, #global phenomenon, #Böll Stiftung, #Brussels, #EU

Executive Summary

This publication presents articles written by prominent feminists, women´s human rights activists, academics and representatives from civil society in Latin American (LA) and the European Union (EU) regarding the mass demonstrations of feminicide. The fifth edition of “Feminicide: A Global Phenomenon” covers topics such as feminicide in different countries, the recent call of the UN-Rapporteur and the absolute criminalization of abortion.

Patricia Jiménez, Ana Martínez Fernández — Heinrich Böll Stiftung

Global → femicide

Femicide Volume 2: Istanbul Convention | ACUNS Vienna

January 1, 2014 — Research, Analysis, Report, Study

 

Second volume of the ACUNS Femicide series on forced marriage, VAW and the Istanbul Convention.

ACUNS Vienna Liaision Office Femicide Team

 

On the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, ACUNS Vienna organized its second annual symposium, focusing on “Forced Marriage, Violence against Women and the Istanbul Convention.” The symposium brought together high-ranking diplomats, representatives from UNFPA, UN Women, UNICEF, OHCHR, and UNODC, with the President of the Austrian Parliament, Ms. Barbara Prammer, who addressed the meeting. The leading proponents of the Council of Europe Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women, Ms. Feride Acar, Ambassador Dubravka Simonovic, Ms. Gisela Wurm, Ms. Liri Kopaci-Di Michele and Mr. José Mendes Bota made convincing arguments as to why such a detailed convention was relevant and open to all countries.

Femicide: A Global Issue that Demands Action not only contains the proceedings of the symposium, but also includes recent resolutions, debates and legal instruments from the General Assembly, Security Council, Human Rights Council, the Crime Commission, statements of high-ranking officials as well as country and regional reports by Heinrich Böll Stiftung, and additional experts and academia. Additionally, the most heinous crimes against women and girls are examined: early, child and forced marriage; sexual violence as a tactic of war; women’s exacerbated vulnerability in armed conflict; pregnancies resulting from rape; structural and domestic violence against migrant women. The importance of civil society including women’s organizations to end impunity and to thoroughly investigate and prosecute persons responsible for these serious crimes was explicitly referred to within the publication.

#APRAN Research, Analysis, Report, Study

Femicide Volume 2: Istanbul Convention | ACUNS Vienna

January 1, 2014
#femicide, #Istanbul Convention, #VAW, #GA resolution, #resolution

Executive Summary

 

Second volume of the ACUNS Femicide series on forced marriage, VAW and the Istanbul Convention.

ACUNS Vienna Liaision Office Femicide Team

 

On the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, ACUNS Vienna organized its second annual symposium, focusing on “Forced Marriage, Violence against Women and the Istanbul Convention.” The symposium brought together high-ranking diplomats, representatives from UNFPA, UN Women, UNICEF, OHCHR, and UNODC, with the President of the Austrian Parliament, Ms. Barbara Prammer, who addressed the meeting. The leading proponents of the Council of Europe Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women, Ms. Feride Acar, Ambassador Dubravka Simonovic, Ms. Gisela Wurm, Ms. Liri Kopaci-Di Michele and Mr. José Mendes Bota made convincing arguments as to why such a detailed convention was relevant and open to all countries.

Femicide: A Global Issue that Demands Action not only contains the proceedings of the symposium, but also includes recent resolutions, debates and legal instruments from the General Assembly, Security Council, Human Rights Council, the Crime Commission, statements of high-ranking officials as well as country and regional reports by Heinrich Böll Stiftung, and additional experts and academia. Additionally, the most heinous crimes against women and girls are examined: early, child and forced marriage; sexual violence as a tactic of war; women’s exacerbated vulnerability in armed conflict; pregnancies resulting from rape; structural and domestic violence against migrant women. The importance of civil society including women’s organizations to end impunity and to thoroughly investigate and prosecute persons responsible for these serious crimes was explicitly referred to within the publication.

Global → VAW

Comparison of The Istanbul Convention and the CEDAW Framework | Council of Europe

January 1, 2018 — Policies and Guidelines

A comparison of key measures to prevent and combat violence against women.

Council of Europe

"Opened for signature in Istanbul in May 2011, the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (Istanbul Convention) is the first legally-binding instrument in Europe in this field, and in terms of scope, the most far reaching international treaty to tackle this serious violation of human rights. It aims at zero tolerance for such violence and is a major step forward in making Europe and beyond a safer place. By accepting the Istanbul Convention, governments are obliged to change their laws, introduce practical measures and allocate resources to effectively prevent and combat violence against women and domestic violence..."

#APRAN Policies and Guidelines

Comparison of The Istanbul Convention and the CEDAW Framework | Council of Europe

January 1, 2018
#Istanbul Convention, #CEDAW, #comparison, #analysis, #framework, #Council of Europe, #Europe, #violence against women, #VAW

Executive Summary

A comparison of key measures to prevent and combat violence against women.

Council of Europe

"Opened for signature in Istanbul in May 2011, the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (Istanbul Convention) is the first legally-binding instrument in Europe in this field, and in terms of scope, the most far reaching international treaty to tackle this serious violation of human rights. It aims at zero tolerance for such violence and is a major step forward in making Europe and beyond a safer place. By accepting the Istanbul Convention, governments are obliged to change their laws, introduce practical measures and allocate resources to effectively prevent and combat violence against women and domestic violence..."

Europe → VAW

Istanbul Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence (2011) | Council of Europe

January 1, 2011 — Landmark Document

The Istanbul Convention is the major European convention that includes a framework to prevent femicide.

Council of Europe

"The Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence is based on the understanding that violence against women is a form of gender-based violence that is committed against women because they are women. It is the obligation of the state to address it fully in all its forms and to take measures to prevent violence against women, protect its victims and prosecute the perpetrators. Failure to do so would make it the responsibility of the state. The convention leaves no doubt: there can be no real equality between women and men if women experience gender-based violence on a large-scale and state agencies and institutions turn a blind eye.

Because it is not only women and girls who suffer domestic violence, parties to the convention are encouraged to apply the protective framework it creates to men who are exposed to violence within the family or domestic unit. Nevertheless, it should not be overlooked that the majority of victims of domestic violence are women and that domestic violence against them is part of a wider pattern of discrimination and inequality. Treaty open for signature by the member States, the non-member States which have participated in its elaboration and by the European Union, and for accession by other non-member States..."

#APRAN Landmark Document

Istanbul Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence (2011) | Council of Europe

January 1, 2011
#femicide, #VAW, #Council of Europe, #Istanbul Convention, #convention, #EU

Executive Summary

The Istanbul Convention is the major European convention that includes a framework to prevent femicide.

Council of Europe

"The Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence is based on the understanding that violence against women is a form of gender-based violence that is committed against women because they are women. It is the obligation of the state to address it fully in all its forms and to take measures to prevent violence against women, protect its victims and prosecute the perpetrators. Failure to do so would make it the responsibility of the state. The convention leaves no doubt: there can be no real equality between women and men if women experience gender-based violence on a large-scale and state agencies and institutions turn a blind eye.

Because it is not only women and girls who suffer domestic violence, parties to the convention are encouraged to apply the protective framework it creates to men who are exposed to violence within the family or domestic unit. Nevertheless, it should not be overlooked that the majority of victims of domestic violence are women and that domestic violence against them is part of a wider pattern of discrimination and inequality. Treaty open for signature by the member States, the non-member States which have participated in its elaboration and by the European Union, and for accession by other non-member States..."